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Don't start NaNoWriMo without these:



And don't forget these handy shortcuts:



Art by Tom Gauld. Click the pics for links.

Last line

Oct. 7th, 2015 10:59 am
nelc: Possibly a Glock 28 in Hello Kitty colours (Glock)
It just popped into my head:Spoiler, in case I ever write this story )

So I got a beginning and an end. It's just the messy bit in the middle I need to write. Maybe I should blow the dust off that story and give it another go.
nelc: Toy Story alien photographer (camera)


Ursula LG writes:
I guess the way to make something good is to make it well.

If the ingredients are extra good (truffles, vivid prose, fascinating characters) that’s a help. But it’s what you do with them that counts. With the most ordinary ingredients (potatoes, everyday language, commonplace characters) — and care and skill in using them — you can make something extremely good. A lot of memorable novels have been made that way. Even with undistinguished language and predictable characters, if a story has interesting, convincing ideas or events, good pacing, a narrative that carries the reader to a conclusion that in one way or another satisfies — it’s a good story. A lot of memorable sf has been made that way.

Inexperienced writers tend to seek the recipes for writing well. You buy the cookbook, you take the list of ingredients, you follow the directions, and behold! A masterpiece! The Never-Falling Soufflé!
nelc: (Jennifer)


Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] haikujaguar at The Word Mines: An Adventure for Authors of All Levels

[livejournal.com profile] ursulav sent me to the word mines a couple of days ago without a map! I fixed that. In the spirit of our deadline/freetime/boots of no "quasi-D&D" setting for authors, then, I present it to you.

wordmines-with-key

Click to embiggen!
nelc: (Default)
Sophia McDougal in The New Statesman:
I hate Strong Female Characters.

As someone spends a fair amount of time complaining on the internet that there aren’t enough female heroes out there, this may seem a strange and out of character thing to say.

And of course, I love all sorts of female characters who exhibit great resilience and courage. I love it when Angel asks Buffy what’s left when he takes away her weapons and her friends and she grabs his sword between her palms and says “Me”. In Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, I love Zhang Ziyi’s Jen sneering “He is my defeated foe” when asked if she’s related to Chow Yun-Fat's Li Mu Bai. I love Jane Eyre declaring “I care for myself” despite the world’s protracted assault on her self-esteem. My despair that the film industry believes the world is more ready for a film featuring a superhero who is a raccoon than it is for a film led by a superhero who is a woman is long and loud.

But the phrase “Strong Female Character” has always set my teeth on edge, and so have many of the characters who have so plainly been written to fit the bill.


A Kate Beaton cartoon seems apropos:

Cut for size )

Nanowrimo

Nov. 1st, 2011 02:18 am
nelc: (Default)
Well, John Meaney said a couple of months ago he'd be interested in seeing something I'd written, so of course I haven't written anything. Then Hafwit said yesterday that he was going to try and write something every day for Nanowrimo, though not actually a novel, and post to LJ. And then there's hwrnmnbsol who I friended recently, who manages to put out a kiloword every day just for fun.

So I'm going to give it a go. I might crash and burn straight away, but maybe I'll get a weeks' worth of something done.

I think it'll either be the brainpeeling story or something about a fantasy queen and queen consort (it may involve a constitutional crisis). Or maybe I'll have a dream tonight and try and turn it into a story.
nelc: (Default)
Mamet's memo to the writers of The Unit is pretty interesting reading. It's easier to read in mixed case.

After the cut )
nelc: (Default)
The Guardian solicits various writers for their 10 rules for writing fiction. Part 1. Part 2.

I like Roddy Doyle's #1. Helen Dunmore's #8 counters Richard Ford's #2. AL Kennedy's #10 is worth remembering. Philip Pullmore's one rule is the funniest. No, I take it back; Will Self's #10 is funnier.

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