nelc: (Jennifer)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] jimhines at Reporting Sexual Harassment in SF/F, 2013 Edition

I first put together this resource list in 2010. I intend to keep updating and reposting it every year until it’s no longer necessary.


If you’ve been sexually harassed, it’s your choice whether or not to report that harassment. It’s not an easy choice, and I obviously can’t guarantee the outcome. But I can tell you that if someone has harassed you, it’s 99% certain that he (or she) has done it to others. You’re not alone.


Please also see this post by Elise Matthesen about reporting sexual harassment. Of particular note is her explanation of the “formal” reporting process vs. informal or anonymous reports.


Reporting to Publishers:


As a general rule, if you’ve been sexually harassed by an editor or another employee of a publisher, complaints can be directed to the publisher’s H.R. department. Please note that reporting to H.R. will usually trigger a formal, legal response.


I’ve spoken to people at several publishers to get names and contact information for complaints, both formal and informal. I’ve put asterisks by the publishers where I spoke with someone directly.



  • Ace: See Penguin, below.

  • Apex Publications*: “Any harassment issues related to Apex Publications should be sent to Jason Sizemore.” jason -at- apexbookcompany.com.

  • Baen*: Toni Weisskopf, toni -at- baen.com. From Toni, “You would come to me with any complaint about the company.”

  • DAW*: Sheila Gilbert (sheila.gilbert -at- us.penguingroup.com) or Betsy Wollheim (betsy.wollheim -at- us.penguingroup.com).

  • Del Rey/Spectra*: HumanResources -at- randomhouse.com.

  • Edge*: Brian Hades (publisher -at- hadespublications.com).

  • Harper Collins: feedback2 -at- harpercollins.com.

  • Jo Fletcher Books*: Contact Jo Fletcher directly. jo.fletcher -at- jofletcherbooks.co.uk.

  • Orbit: Andrea Weinzimer, VP of Human Resources. andrea.weinzimer -at- hbgusa.com. Inappropriate conduct can also be brought up with the publisher, Tim Holman tim.holman -at- hbgusa.com.

  • Penguin: Contact page links to an e-mail submission form.

  • Random House: Contact page has some info.

  • Roc: See Penguin, above.

  • Solaris Books: Please use the Contact Page.

  • Tor*: Report the incident directly to Macmillan Human Resources, or to Beth Meacham, at bam -at- panix.com or in person. Reports can also be made online at http://speakup.macmillan.com (please note that the online form is not a “formal” report unless you follow up with HR).


Publishers – I would love to expand this list with better information. Please contact me.


Reporting to Conventions:


Often harassment doesn’t come from editors, but from authors, convention guests, or other fans. If this happens at a convention, you can contact convention security, ops, and/or the convention committee. Many (but not all) conventions include harassment policies in the program books and the websites.


A convention committee doesn’t have the same power as an employer. However, if harassment is reported at a convention, the individual may be confronted or asked to leave. In addition, reporting harassment by guests (authors, editors, etc.) is very helpful to the convention in deciding who not to invite back.


To any convention staff, I would encourage you to make sure you have a harassment policy in place, and equally importantly, that your volunteers are aware of that policy and willing to enforce it. Please see the “Other Resources” section below for starting points on developing such a policy, if you haven’t already done so.


Please see also John Scalzi’s Convention Harassment Policy Pledge, which has been c0-signed by more than 700 people who will not attend conventions that lack a posted and adequately publicized harassment policy.


Other:


Science Fiction/Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA):


Per SFWA’s president Steven Gould, if you feel you are being harassed at a SFWA event or in SFWA online environs, please contact any SFWA board member, employee, or our ombudsman, Cynthia Felice, at ombudsman -at- sfwa.org. You don’t have to wait until after the fact to report it. (Though that is also your choice. There is no expiration date on harassment.)



What to Expect:


Ideally, someone who was sexually harassed could report it and expect to be treated with respect. Her or his concerns would be taken seriously, and all possible steps would be taken to make sure the behavior did not happen again, and that the offender understood such behavior was unacceptable. Disciplinary action would be taken when appropriate.


This is not a perfect world. Employers are required to follow the laws and their own policies, which take time. Even a formal report may result in nothing more than a warning (particularly if this is the first report of harassment).


That said, when I originally posted about sexual harassment in fandom, everyone who responded expressed that such behavior was unacceptable. And there were a lot of responses, from fans, authors, editors, con staff, and agents. The growing conversation suggests that more and more of us are taking sexual harassment seriously and working to put an end to this behavior.


As a rape counselor, I saw how powerful and important it can be to break the silence around assault and harassment. However, it’s always your choice whether or not to report. Making that report will be stressful. It may also be empowering, but there are no guarantees. It may or may not have visible results.


First and foremost, please do whatever is necessary to take care of yourself.


Other Resources:



Essays:



Please contact me if you know of additional resources that should be included here.


Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

nelc: (Default)
Haven't seen this on LJ yet:
Readercon 23
Public Statement By the Readercon Convention Committee


August 5, 2012

In regard to the harassment complaint brought by Genevieve Valentine against René Walling for his actions at Readercon 23, with additional relevant information provided by Kate Kligman, and the Readercon board's decision to restrict Mr. Walling from membership for two years, in contravention of Readercon's stated policy that harassment at Readercon will be met with a lifetime ban:

We, the Readercon convention committee (concom), unreservedly offer the following apologies and statements to the individual people who have been hurt by Readercon's actions, to the larger Readercon community, and to everyone who has been distressed by the Readercon board's decision and its implications, especially in the context of recent discussions about the toxicity of harassment and the need for event organizers to create safer spaces. While the original complaint and decision were handled by the Readercon board rather than the concom, we take full responsibility for correcting the board's errors, providing redress to those who have been harmed, and taking active steps to make Readercon safer and more comfortable.


More at the link.
nelc: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] jimhines at Reporting Sexual Harassment in SF/F

I first put together this resource list in 2010. I updated and reposted last year, and intend to keep doing so every year until it’s no longer necessary. (Yeah, I know…)


I want to make it as clear as I can that if you’ve been sexually harassed, it’s your choice whether or not to report that harassment. It’s not an easy choice, and as we’ve seen, even written policies don’t guarantee the outcome. But I can tell you that if someone has harassed you, it’s 99% certain that he (or she) has done it to others. You’re not alone.


Reporting to Publishers:


As a general rule, if you’ve been sexually harassed by an editor or another employee of a publisher, complaints can be directed to the publisher’s H.R. department. Please note that reporting to H.R. will usually trigger a formal, legal response.


I’ve spoken to people at several publishers to get names and contact information for complaints, both formal and informal. I’ve put asterisks by the publishers where I spoke with someone directly.



  • Ace: See Penguin, below.

  • Apex Publications*: “Any harassment issues related to Apex Publications should be sent to Jason Sizemore.” jason -at- apexbookcompany.com.

  • Baen*: Toni Weisskopf, toni -at- baen.com. From Toni, “You would come to me with any complaint about the company.”

  • DAW*: Sheila Gilbert (sheila.gilbert -at- us.penguingroup.com) or Betsy Wolheim (betsy.wolheim -at- us.penguingroup.com). They can be reached during normal office hours, Tuesday through Thursday.

  • Del Rey/Spectra*: HumanResources -at- randomhouse.com.

  • Edge*: Brian Hades (publisher -at- hadespublications.com).

  • Harper Collins: feedback2 -at- harpercollins.com.

  • Orbit: Andrea Weinzimer, VP of Human Resources. andrea.weinzimer -at- hbgusa.com. Inappropriate conduct can also be brought up with the publisher, Tim Holman tim.holman -at- hbgusa.com.

  • Penguin: Contact page links to an e-mail submission form.

  • Random House: Contact page has some info.

  • Roc: See Penguin, above.

  • Solaris Books: Please use the Contact Page.

  • Tor*: Report the incident directly to Macmillan Human Resources, or to Beth Meacham, at bam -at- panix.com or in person.


Publishers - I would love to expand this list with better information. Please contact me.


Reporting to Conventions:


Often harassment doesn’t come from editors, but from authors or other fans. If this happens at a convention, another option is to contact the convention committee. Many (but not all) conventions include harassment policies in the program books.


A convention committee doesn’t have the same power as an employer. However, if harassment is reported at a convention, the individual may be confronted or asked to leave. In addition, reporting harassment by guests (authors, editors, etc.) is very helpful to the convention in deciding who not to invite back.


To any convention staff, I would encourage you to make sure you have a harassment policy in place, and equally importantly, that your volunteers are aware of that policy and willing to enforce it.


The Con Anti-Harassment Project includes a list of SF/F conventions and their sexual harassment policies (Note - As of October 2011, this list is rather outdated.)


Other:


Science Fiction/Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) - Per John Scalzi, current SFWA president:


If there is an instance where someone feels that they have been harassed at a SFWA event or in SFWA online environs, they may contact the board. This should ideally be done through their regional director, or by contacting SFWA’s ombudsman, Cynthia Felice, at ombudsman -at- sfwa.org. SFWA takes very seriously the responsibility to have its events and online areas be places where members and others feel safe and valued.


What to Expect:


Ideally, someone who was sexually harassed could report it and expect to be treated with respect. Her or his concerns would be taken seriously, and all possible steps would be taken to make sure the behavior did not happen again, and that the offender understood such behavior was unacceptable. Disciplinary action would be taken when appropriate.


This is not a perfect world. Employers are required to follow the laws and their own policies, which may mean a report results in nothing more than a warning (particularly if this is the first report of harassment). And as we’ve recently seen with Readercon, there are no guarantees that a convention will even follow its own policies.


That said, when I originally posted about sexual harassment in fandom, everyone who responded expressed that such behavior was unacceptable. And there were a lot of responses, from fans, authors, editors, con staff, and agents. The backlash against the Readercon decision suggests that a lot of us are taking sexual harassment more seriously.


As a rape counselor, I saw how powerful and important it can be to break the silence around assault and harassment. However, it’s always your choice whether or not to report. Making that report will be stressful. It may be empowering, but there are no guarantees. It may or may not have visible results.


First and foremost, please do whatever is necessary to take care of yourself.


Other Resources:



Please contact me if you know of related resources which should be included here.


Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

nelc: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] jimhines at Supporting Victims of Sexual Harassment

SF/F fandom (and society in general) hasn’t always been very supportive of victims of sexual harassment, particularly when the harasser is a big name or someone in a position of power. Those who choose to speak out are often mocked, belittled, threatened, accused of being publicity-whores, or worse. Even people who want to be supportive might not know what to say or do.


So with the help of some friends, I’ve put together a list of ideas about what to do and what not to do if you want to avoid looking like a dick and actually support those who have been sexually harassed.


1. Don’t Make Excuses. At the 2006 Worldcon, Harlan Ellison grabbed Connie Willis’ breast on stage. Time after time, I saw people jumping in to defend him by saying, “Oh, that’s just Harlan.” That’s a bullshit excuse, right up there with “Boys will be boys,” and “Oh, he didn’t mean any harm.” It’s not your job to excuse, justify, or defend the behavior, especially if you weren’t even present. By doing so, you’re basically saying, “I don’t care about your feelings or what this person did to you; I’m more worried about protecting the person who harassed you.”


2. Don’t Minimize. In one of my posts about sexual harassment, a commenter talked about how she was expecting a bunch of overly sensitive PC whiners who couldn’t take a joke. Don’t be that person. If you’re not the one being harassed, then what the hell gives you the right to judge and tell someone else they’re overreacting?


3. Don’t Immediately Run Off to “Kick his Ass!” Believe me, I understand the urge. When I hear someone has harassed and hurt one of my friends, I want to do something. I want to punish the harasser. I want to teach him (or her) to never pull that shit again … do you notice how all of these sentences start with “I”? How I’m talking about what I want and need, not what the person who was harassed is asking for? It’s more helpful to offer to be that person’s backup: to accompany them if they want to confront the person, or to tell them you’ve got their back during the convention or event.


4a. Don’t be Afraid to Intervene. If you see something that looks like harassment, say something. Interrupt and ask, “Hey, is everything okay here?” Yes, it’s hard. Yes, it can be embarassing if it turns out nothing was going on. But which risk would you rather take: that you might feel a little foolish, or that you’re turning your back and allowing someone to continue harassing another person? I’ll be saying more about intervention in my next post.


4b. Don’t be Afraid to Call Your Friends on their Shit. If you know your friend is harassing people, then for God’s sake, call him (or her) on it. Be harsh. Be blunt. Because your friend might actually listen to you. By staying silent, you are enabling and tacitly allowing that person to continue harassing others.


5. Don’t Try to Speak For Someone Else. When I was at World Fantasy last year, I ended up talking to multiple people about a certain editor who had sexually harassed them. It wasn’t my place to disclose their names or the name of the editor. I did end up writing a blog post with names removed, figuring since this was a common behavior, there was no way to identify the people who had spoken with me. Some of those people still felt that I had violated their confidentiality. Reporting sexual harassment or going public is a very hard choice, and it’s not your choice to make for someone else.


6. Don’t Pressure the Victim. Offer options. Offer to go with the person or to be their backup if they decide to report or confront. But don’t say “This is what you have to do, and if you don’t do it then it’s all your fault when this guy harasses someone else!” Because first off, when that guy harasses someone else, it’s his fault. It’s his choice. If you want more people to come forward and report sexual harassment, work to create an enviroment where it’s safe for them to do so.


7. Check Your Own Behaviors. A lot of harassers either don’t think of what they’re doing as harassment or else they rationalize what they’re doing. So check yourself. Check your physical and verbal behaviors. If you’re uncertain whether a gesture or joke or compliment would be appreciated, ask. If an interaction leaves you feeling weird, ask someone else for a reality-check.


8. Use Your Voice. Especially for guys, it’s easy to sit back and ignore the problem. To let other people worry about it. But your voice matters. Speaking up to say this kind of behavior is not okay matters. It matters to victims, who deserve to know that people are on their side, and it matters to harassers, who have to know that others don’t condone their crap.


#


Related:


Reporting Sexual Harassment in SF/F Circles
The Backup Project


Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

nelc: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] jimhines at Supporting Victims of Sexual Harassment

SF/F fandom (and society in general) hasn’t always been very supportive of victims of sexual harassment, particularly when the harasser is a big name or someone in a position of power. Those who choose to speak out are often mocked, belittled, threatened, accused of being publicity-whores, or worse. Even people who want to be supportive might not know what to say or do.


So with the help of some friends, I’ve put together a list of ideas about what to do and what not to do if you want to avoid looking like a dick and actually support those who have been sexually harassed.


1. Don’t Make Excuses. At the 2006 Worldcon, Harlan Ellison grabbed Connie Willis’ breast on stage. Time after time, I saw people jumping in to defend him by saying, “Oh, that’s just Harlan.” That’s a bullshit excuse, right up there with “Boys will be boys,” and “Oh, he didn’t mean any harm.” It’s not your job to excuse, justify, or defend the behavior, especially if you weren’t even present. By doing so, you’re basically saying, “I don’t care about your feelings or what this person did to you; I’m more worried about protecting the person who harassed you.”


2. Don’t Minimize. In one of my posts about sexual harassment, a commenter talked about how she was expecting a bunch of overly sensitive PC whiners who couldn’t take a joke. Don’t be that person. If you’re not the one being harassed, then what the hell gives you the right to judge and tell someone else they’re overreacting?


3. Don’t Immediately Run Off to “Kick his Ass!” Believe me, I understand the urge. When I hear someone has harassed and hurt one of my friends, I want to do something. I want to punish the harasser. I want to teach him (or her) to never pull that shit again … do you notice how all of these sentences start with “I”? How I’m talking about what I want and need, not what the person who was harassed is asking for? It’s more helpful to offer to be that person’s backup: to accompany them if they want to confront the person, or to tell them you’ve got their back during the convention or event.


4a. Don’t be Afraid to Intervene. If you see something that looks like harassment, say something. Interrupt and ask, “Hey, is everything okay here?” Yes, it’s hard. Yes, it can be embarassing if it turns out nothing was going on. But which risk would you rather take: that you might feel a little foolish, or that you’re turning your back and allowing someone to continue harassing another person? I’ll be saying more about intervention in my next post.


4b. Don’t be Afraid to Call Your Friends on their Shit. If you know your friend is harassing people, then for God’s sake, call him (or her) on it. Be harsh. Be blunt. Because your friend might actually listen to you. By staying silent, you are enabling and tacitly allowing that person to continue harassing others.


5. Don’t Try to Speak For Someone Else. When I was at World Fantasy last year, I ended up talking to multiple people about a certain editor who had sexually harassed them. It wasn’t my place to disclose their names or the name of the editor. I did end up writing a blog post with names removed, figuring since this was a common behavior, there was no way to identify the people who had spoken with me. Some of those people still felt that I had violated their confidentiality. Reporting sexual harassment or going public is a very hard choice, and it’s not your choice to make for someone else.


6. Don’t Pressure the Victim. Offer options. Offer to go with the person or to be their backup if they decide to report or confront. But don’t say “This is what you have to do, and if you don’t do it then it’s all your fault when this guy harasses someone else!” Because first off, when that guy harasses someone else, it’s his fault. It’s his choice. If you want more people to come forward and report sexual harassment, work to create an enviroment where it’s safe for them to do so.


7. Check Your Own Behaviors. A lot of harassers either don’t think of what they’re doing as harassment or else they rationalize what they’re doing. So check yourself. Check your physical and verbal behaviors. If you’re uncertain whether a gesture or joke or compliment would be appreciated, ask. If an interaction leaves you feeling weird, ask someone else for a reality-check.


8. Use Your Voice. Especially for guys, it’s easy to sit back and ignore the problem. To let other people worry about it. But your voice matters. Speaking up to say this kind of behavior is not okay matters. It matters to victims, who deserve to know that people are on their side, and it matters to harassers, who have to know that others don’t condone their crap.


#


Related:


Reporting Sexual Harassment in SF/F Circles
The Backup Project


Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

nelc: (Default)
In PZ Myers' latest post on the subject, commenter Rorschach neatly sums up the threads so far:
Rebecca : Guys,don't do that.
PZ : Rebecca sez "Guys don't do that"
Dawkins : Argument from FGM in sub-saharan Africa
Blogosphere: WTF ??
Rebecca : You're wrong, I'm hurt, and you are not one I consider an ally in addressing sexism in the atheist or skeptic movement anymore
Blogosphere: Rebecca called all menz rapists and misogynists !
Fleas : Mumblebumblegarblewarble, pro, contra, blabla
Me et al : Time to stop ??

*repeat ad infinitum*


At this stage I'm wondering how many involved in this are just trolls doing it for the lulz. Honestly, how can anyone go from "Guys, don't do that" to "OMG, Rebecca says we can't talk to women anymore" and hold that opinion for longer than the ten minutes it takes to look at her video and think about it? Okay, maybe an hour for the slow ones.

Also, Richard Dawkins, I am so disappointed in you. I hope you're having a good think and will be coming up with a brilliant apology soon.
nelc: Stop groping (sexual harassment)
So there's been a small internet storm over a minor encounter Rebecca Watson had in an elevator at an atheist convention, and the remarks she made about it.

I say "minor" not to downplay it or any similar encounters anyone has had, but because Watson noted the encounter solely for the irony of the situation: that of being propositioned in an elevator at a convention at four in the morning, a convention at which she'd given a talk about, you know, stuff like that.

I have to admit that when I first started reading about it on PZ Myers blog at Pharyngula, I wasn't very sympathetic. I know people go to conventions for all sorts of social interaction, including sexual, and at some point someone's got ask someone else if they want a cup of coffee, else there's nothing going to happen that way. It would be nice if people could be as witty as a Hollywood movie, but clichés are clichés for a reason.

But I read on. I didn't really get the thing about the elevator at first; the worst thing that's happened to me in an elevator was somebody else's fart. But, yeah, being in an elevator with someone who's propositioning you isn't going to be comfortable, especially considering the other circumstances. But give Elevator Guy a little credit, he took 'No, thank you' for an answer.

On the other side of the balance, though, the whole set-up looks fishy. Watson was chatting in the bar until four in the morning, but from what I can tell Elevator Guy didn't talk to her during this period, despite having been to her earlier talk. Then, when Watson announces that she's running on empty and needs some sleep, he hops on the elevator with her, and then he propositions her. The guy could be socially inept, but that's some fine timing he's got there.

My ideal for folk at conventions is for them (us!) to do whatever they mutually agree upon in whatever combinations and to whatever degree pleases them (including the option of "none at all"). But for that to occur requires communication. Elevator Guy failed in that regard, not for his clichéd inquiry, but for completely ignoring what Watson had had to say in her earlier talk. There was no 'co' in that communication, it was just the guy thinking that he'd like to get off with her. From Watson's account there's no evidence that he'd internalised anything she'd had to say whatsoever. And the fact that he'd avoided talking to her for several hours in the bar gives credence to the view that he wasn't interested in her thoughts at all. Which would probably have made him a lousy lay anyway.

So PZ Myers had some thoughts on the subject of sex at conventions as well, and wrote those up. Not so much the sex, but the bit before the sex. I think they're worth reading. I'd exercise caution with the comments, though, them Pharyngulites like to play rough.

Edit: I suppose I ought to say something about Stef McGraw. McGraw criticised Watson's remarks about Elevator Guy in her blog. Watson then addressed that criticism briefly in a later speech at the convention, and then McGraw felt put upon and blogged about that.

My view is that McGraw publicly criticised Watson, and Watson publicly addressed those criticisms. The circumstances were slightly different, but there's nothing in the rules of debating etiquette that say the disagreement has to stay in the same field at all times. (I'm now thinking of the John Wayne movie The Quiet Man. I shall probably start humming the tune in a minute.) Watson opined, McGraw demurred, Watson riposted, McGraw countered. The change of venue incurred no special penalties on McGraw; she was able to answer, and did, in a setting she was more comfortable in. Where's the problem?
nelc: Stop groping (sexual harassment)
Over in RPG.net, in Sethra's thread about her con panel on sexual harassment, comes news of KeyCon's overdue attempt to get their house in order, with this open letter.
Dear Keycon Members, [..]

Early in 2010, the committee chairs realized that the code of conduct used by Keycon inadequately addressed several issues including assault, harassment, and inclusion of diversity among others. A decision was made to pursue making changes to the code through the Senate; however, that process has proven to be too slow. Among the complaints we have heard resoundingly that the absence of our code of conduct opens a space for potential abuse and potentially further assaults. [..]

To promote safety at Keycon 28, the convention committee has enacted this strategy:

  1. The convention code of conduct has been revised. It now clearly outlines policies concerning assault and harassment. The code of conduct also clearly indicates that these behaviours among others will not be tolerated and the consequences we will enact to those who breach our code of conduct.

  2. The convention has invited the Winnipeg Police Service to conduct a panel about personal safety and sexual assault. This panel will occur as a follow-up to opening ceremonies where we expect to have our largest audience.

  3. The convention will hold a Saturday morning panel on women’s self-defence. This panel will feature further information about assaults along with strategies for personal protection.

  4. Convention Security will wear a visible uniform (likely t-shirts with HUGE writing).

  5. Operations (Room 1510) will house both security staff and volunteers to ensure that someone is available 24 hours a day while the convention is on-site at the hotel.

  6. Security information, contact numbers and the code of conduct will be posted at all elevators, inside convention suites on the 15th floor, and in bathrooms in the convention space.

  7. The convention committee will undergo mandatory sexual assault crisis intervention training to be able to best respond should a sexual assault occur. The convention has invited volunteers and hotel staff to attend if they are able.

  8. Hospitality suite organizers will be asked to attend a short smart serve seminar to ensure that no one is overfed liquor, Identification is checked and that volunteers are watching for potential threats to the safety of our convention members.

  9. The movies shown by the video room will be vetted and hospitality suites showing films will be notified that they are not to show films that in anyway glorify rape or sexual assault. If a room is found to have shown such films it will be shut down for the duration of the convention.


    Not bad going for a concom that seemed to be having great difficulty wrapping their heads around the problem not very long ago.
    nelc: Stop groping (sexual harassment)
    RPG.net's Sethra007 ran a sexual harassment panel at ConGlomeration 2011 in Louisville over Easter. Here's her video of the panel.

    This is the video of the Harlan Ellison & Connie Willis boob-grab that Sethra shows in the panel, and this is the subway flashing incident.

    Con Anti-Harassment Project.
    Miss Manner's Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behaviour, mentioned in the panel.
    The Geek Fallacies.
    The Back-Up Project.
    Geek Feminism Blog explains the epic fail of The Open Source Boob Project.

    A very good panel, I think. Worth watching or listening to.

    Marketing

    Apr. 17th, 2011 04:21 pm
    nelc: Stop groping (stop)
    So, I'm going to Eastercon despite having the two panels cancelled, I'm going to wear one of my shirts (probably over another shirt, if it's not too warm), and I'm going to try to talk to people. I'm anticipating that some will be curious enough to have a short conversation with, at least, while some will just go into avoidance mode.

    Of the former, I figure I can split them into five demographic groups: victims of harassment (mostly female fans), oblivious fans (mostly male), harassers (mostly fans, some celebs, mostly male), con organizers, and writers & other celebs. Each of these will require a different pitch, I think.

    • Victims need to know that they are not alone, that they have suffered a wrong, and that something can be done to change the situation for them personally and for fandom as a whole.


    • Oblivious fans need to be convinced that the problem exists, that it is a problem both at an individual level and for fandom as a whole, and that they can be part of the solution.


    • Harassers are going to be problematic. Some will need to be convinced that there are better ways to get your jollies than treating all women at conventions as though they were your Gorean slaves; some will be cold-hearted serial harassers who will be seeking to disrupt any attempt to change the environment in which they predate; some need to be shown that silence is not assent.


    • Con organizers are similar to the oblivious fans, except that they have a further political dimension. They have a vested interest in denying that the problem exists, since sometimes bad publicity is just bad publicity, and geek conventions get enough mocking publicity as it is. They also have the fear that the problem is just too big to manage (partly their own fault for ignoring it for so long). In the first case, showing them that having a working policy, or at least a declaration of intent, can only be a good thing; and that continuing to ignore it can only mean that the situation will get worse, continuing to drive female fans away. In the second case, they need to be shown that they only need to do a few very simple things: agree that harassment is wrong and must be dealt with, in the interests of natural justice and allowing fandom to grow; to specifically address harassment as an issue; and to acknowledge that some situations are too big for a bunch of amateur con organizers to deal with, but that the proper course is to kick these to the relevant authorities (venue security and/or the police) and not to ignore the problem. OTOH, the situations that are scaled to a concom's purview can be dealt with by the con staff.


    • Writers and other celebs will split into two groups: the harassers and potential allies. The former will need to be handled just as mundane harassers above, though perhaps a bit more delicately or robustly, I'm not sure which. The latter may be oblivious or despairing: getting them onboard to speak out against harassment will help swing the con organizers, make them feel that they're contributing, and put peer-pressure on the harassers, who may be inclined to ignore the noises of the hoi polloi.


    Comments, anyone?

    PS I will be doing the normal fan things, as well, and I don't intend to make a pain of myself. I trust a bit of calm, rational chat will do more than ranting at people.
    nelc: (Default)
    An older entry uses a Flash thing to link to my Zazzle shop. That is a normal link, in case you're looking from a Flash-disabled browser, and here are a couple of the products:



    Basic Stopping Harassment at Cons tee. If I set it up right you should be able to select different garments and colours, if you choose (though this version only really works on red).



    The budget version, only available in white.



    Same message, on black.

    Edit: You may want to edit the addresses you get from the relevant links to .co.uk or .com to get the right pricing, depending whether you're reading this from the UK or US.

    Zazzle

    Apr. 14th, 2011 06:05 pm
    nelc: (Default)
    I haz a shop, let me show you it:


    Make personalized gifts at Zazzle.


    I'm still putting up product (and Zazzle is taking its time updating) but the basic tee-shirt as worn by model Ian in a previous post is available now, if anyone wants one. And who wouldn't?

    Full disclosure: I will make 10% off each sale, and that will go towards paying for my trip to Eastercon. I only need 60-odd sales to pay for petrol and room, hint, hint.

    I will be modelling the basic version at Eastercon.

    CaféPress

    Apr. 14th, 2011 01:21 am
    nelc: Stop groping (sexual harassment)
    ...why are you such a bitch?

    Why do you ask me to create some product, list the product on a page, allow me to open a shop, and then not know that I might like to transfer the product I just made into the shop? And that if I stop crying for a minute at your stupidity, and give in and start to create new product, why do you not realise that I don't want to upload the designs I already uploaded again? I am not in the mood for this shit.

    Meanwhile, I got my mate Ian to model the two designs I want to sell in the shop:

    Photobucket Photobucket

    Actually, if I succeed in getting CaféPress to work, the designs will be a tad smaller than that.
    nelc: (Default)
    Had some very fruitful discussions at RPG.net in the past month or so. I thought it might be worth linking them here:

    On being felt up by old men

    On being felt up by old men, part 2

    Heroic Bystanders: Volunteers against convention harassement

    Groping

    You will need to be a member of RPG.net to read those. But getting membership's relatively painless, free, and you can always lie about the details. If you do feel you have to comment, bear in mind that the moderation is pretty damn good, so make sure you keep to the rules and don't troll or sass the mods if they tell you to do (or not do) something.
    nelc: (Default)
    Feeling a bit stunned, as I have talked myself into organising not one, but two, panels at Illustrious in Birmingham in two months time, on the subject of Sexual Harassment in SF Fandom. Never organised a panel at a con; not really a big con-goer, really; not terribly clued up on feminist theory; don't have an idea on who I should ask to be on either panel.

    Only idea I've had so far is that one panel should be on fan experience of harassment, at all levels; and the other should be a discussion of what an ideal con sexual harassment policy should look like. This may change according to whatever.

    Also, my internet is broken today (thank you, Virgin Media), so I'm using my limited Mi-Fi connection. Emails might have to wait until the internet isn't broken, and when I'm feeling a bit less stunned.

    Oh, advice and suggestions will be gratefully received.

    Going out to take some pictures now.

    Profile

    nelc: (Default)
    nelc

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